New York State Cyber Regulations Get Real

New York State Cyber Regulations Get Real

We wrote about NY’s innovate cyber regulations earlier this year. For those who don’t remember, NY State Department of Financial Services (NYSDFS) launched GDPR-like cyber security regulations for its massive financial industry, including requirements for 72-hour breach reporting, limited data retention, and designation of a chief information security officer.

As legal experts have noted, New York leads the rest of the states in its tough data security rules for banks, insurance, and investment companies. And after Equifax, it has proposed extending these rules to credit reporting agencies that operate in the state.

Transition Period Has Ended

The NYS rules are very process-oriented and similar to the GDPR in requiring documented security policies, response planning, and assessments – basically you have to be able to “show your work”.

However, there also specific technical requirements, unlike the GDPR, that have to be complied with as well: for example, pen testing, multi-factor authentication, and limiting access privileges.

Anyway, the cyber regulations went into effect on March 1, 2017, but most of the rules have a 180-day grace period. That period ended in late August.

There are exceptions.

They extended up to one year – March 1, 2018 — some of the more technical requirements: for example, performing pen testing and vulnerability assessments and conducting periodic risk assessments. And up to 18-months for implementing audit trails and application-level security.

So NY financial companies have a little extra time for the nittier rules.

However, that does mean that the 72-hour breach reporting rule is in effect!

Varonis Can Help

I’d like to add that the NYSDFS rules on breach reporting cover a far broader type of cyber event than any other state. Typically, state breach rules have language that requires notification for the exposure of certain types of PII data — see our totally awesome graphics to instantly visualize this.

While these NY rules protect similar types of PII as other states – social security and credit card numbers as well as online identifiers – financial companies in New York will also have to report on cyber events, as defined as follows:

Cybersecurity Event means any act or attempt, successful or unsuccessful, to gain unauthorized access to, disrupt or misuse an Information System or information stored on such Information System.

Note the language for any attempt to gain access or to disrupt or misuse system. This encompasses not only standard data exposures where personal data is stolen, but also denial-of-service (DoS), ransomware, and any kind of post-exploitation where the system tools are leveraged and misused.

Based on my reading and looking closely at the state’s FAQ, financial companies will have to notify NY regulators within 72-hours of data exposures involving PII and cybersecurity events “that have a reasonable likelihood  of materially harming” normal operations – see Section 500.17.

With data attacks now becoming the new normal, this tough notification rule — first in the US! — will likely require IT departments to put in significant technical effort to meet this tight timeline.

Varonis can help NY financial companies.

Ask to see a demo of our DatAlert product and get right with NYSDFS!

 

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