Our Most Underappreciated Blog Posts of 2017

Our Most Underappreciated Blog Posts of 2017

Another year, another 1293 data breaches involving over 174 million records. According to our friends at the Identity Theft Resource Center, 2017 has made history by breaking 2016’s record breaking 1091 breaches. Obviously it’s been a year that many who directly defend corporate and government systems will want to forget.

Before we completely wipe 2017 from our memory banks, I decided to take one last look at the previous 12 months worth of IOS posts.  While there are more than a few posts that did not receive the traffic we had hoped, they nevertheless contained some really valuable security ideas and practical advice.

In no particular order, here are my favorite underachieving posts of the 2017 blogging year.

Interviews

Wade Baker Speaks – We did a lot of interviews with security pros this year —researchers, front-line IT warriors, CDOs, privacy attorneys.  But I was most excited by our chat with Wade Baker. The name may not be familiar, but for years Baker produced the Verizon DBIR, this blog’s favorite source of breach stats. In this transcript, Wade shares great data-driven insights into the threat environment, data breach costs, and how to convince executives to invest in more data security.

Ann Cavoukian and GDPR – It’s hard to believe that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is only a few months away. You can draw a line from Cavoukian’s Privacy by Design ideas to the GDPR.  For companies doing business in the EU, it will soon be the case that PbD will effectively be the law. Read the Cavoukian transcript to get more inspired.

Diversity and Data Security – The more I learn about data security and privacy, the more I’m convinced that it will “take a village”.  The threat is too complex for it to be pigeon-holed into an engineering problem. A real-world approach will involve multiple disciplines — psychology, sociology, law, design, red-team thinking, along with computer smarts. In this interview with Allison Avery, Senior Organizational Development & Diversity Excellence Specialist at NYU Langone Medical Center, we learn that you shouldn’t have preconceived notions of who has the right cyber talents.

Infosec Education

PowerShell Malware –  PowerShell is a great next-generation command line shell. In the last few years, hackers have realized this as well and are using PowerShell for malware-free hacking. A few months ago I started looking into obfuscated PowerShell techniques, which allow hackers to hide the evil PowerShell and make it almost impossible for traditional scanners to detect. This is good information for IT people who need to get a first look at the new threat environment. In this two-part series, I referenced a Black Hat presentation given by Lee Holmes — yeah, that guy!  Check out Lee’s comment on the post.

Varonis and Ransomware – This was certainly the year of weaponized ransomware with WannaCry, Petya, et. al. using the NSA-discovered EternalBlue exploit to hold data hostage on a global scale. In this post, we explain how our DatAlert software can be used to detect PsExec, which is used to spread the Petya-variant of the malware. And in this other ransomware post, we also explain how to use DatAlert to detect the mass encryption of files and to limit your risks after ransomware infection.

PowerShell as a Cyber Monitoring Tool – I spent a bit of effort in this long series explaining how to use PowerShell to classify data and monitor events — kind of a roll-your-own Varonis. Alas, it didn’t get the exposure I had hoped. But there are some really great PowerShell tips, and sample code using Register-EngineEvent to monitor low-level file access events. A must read if you’re a PowerShell DIY-er.

Compliance

NIS, the Next Big EU Security Law – While we’ve all been focused on the EU GDPR, there’s more EU data security rules that go into effect in 2018. For example, The Network and Information Security (NIS) Directive.  EU countries have until July 2018 to “transpose” this directive into their own national laws. Effectively, the NIS Directive asks companies involved in critical infrastructure — energy, transportation, telecom, and Internet — to have in place data security procedures and to notify regulators when there’s a serious cyber incident. Unlike the GDPR, this directive is not just about data exposure but covers any significant cyber event, including DoS, ransomware, and data destruction.

GDPR’s 72-Hour Breach Notification – One particular GDPR requirement that’s been causing major headaches for IT is the new breach notification rules. In October, we received guidelines from the regulators. It turns out that there’s more flexibility than was first thought. For example, you can provide EU regulators partial information in the first 72-hours after discovery and more complete information as it becomes available. And there are many instances where companies will not have to additionally contact individuals if the personal data exposed is not financially harmful. It’s complicated so read this post to learn the subtleties.

By the way, we’ve been very proud of our GDPR coverage. At least one of our posts has been snippetized by Google, which means that at least Google’s algorithms think our GDPR content is the cat’s meow. Just sayin’.

Podcasts

Man vs. Machine – Each week Cindy Ng leads a discussion with a few other Varonians, including Mike Buckbee, Killian Englert, and Kris Keyser. In this fascinating podcast, Cindy and her panelists take on the question of ethics in software and data security design. We know all too well that data security is often not thought about when products are sold to consumers — maybe afterwards after a hack. We can and should do a better job in training developers and introducing better data laws, for example the EU GDPR. But what is “good enough” for algorithms that think for themselves in, say,  autonomous cars?  I don’t have the answer, but is what great fun listening to this group talk about this issue.

Cybercrime Startups – It’s strange at first to think of hackers as entrepreneurs and their criminal team as a startup. But in fact there are similarities, and hacking in 2017 starts looking like a viable career option for some. In this perfect drive-time podcast, our panelists explore the everyday world of the cybercrime startup.

Fun Security Facts

Securing S3 –  As someone who uses Amazon Web Services (AWS) to quickly test out ideas for blog posts, I’m a little in awe of Amazon’s cloud magic and also afraid to touch many of the configuration options. Apparently, I’m not the only one who gets lost in AWS since there have been major breach involving its heavily used data storage feature, known as S3. In this post, Mikes covers S3’s buckets and objects and explains how to set up security policies. Find out how to avoid being an S3 victim in 2018!

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