Most Popular Infosec Quotes of the Year

Most Popular Infosec Quotes of the Year

In 2017, we’ve interviewed many privacy experts, chief data officers, security pros and learned so much about the real world. Because we’ve covered so much, I’ve curated the most popular infosec quotes so that we can revisit their sage advice and strategies. Let the ideas simmer so that we can enter 2018 with a stronger vision and execute our ideas smoothly. Enjoy!

1. Yes to diversity and skill set


 

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2. Stop blaming the users


 

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3. Law and technology need to keep up


 

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4. Embed ‘Privacy by Design’ from the start


 

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5. Know what business problem you’re trying to solve


 

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6. CDOs need to know more than just IT


 

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7. Without IT, organizations can’t function


 

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8. Know the business and the algorithm

One of my favorite business talks is from Morgan Stanley’s CDO, Jeffrey McMillian. I never had a chance to interview him, but I distilled key points in a talk he gave at the Chief Data Officier Summit on driving growth, improving inefficiencies, and reducing risk, here.

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  1. Re #6 on CDO profiles. This brings to mind the early days of the CIO. The early truism was that CIOs only lasted 18 months because the good ones moved up to another company and the bad ones got tossed out. Of course in many cases they weren’t “bad” they just weren’t what the (still figuring it all out) CEO needed. Over time, that CIO churn has settled down. How do you see CDO churn in 2018 and why?

    • In interviews w/ CDOs, they voice that smart CDOs won’t take a role unless there’s support and acknowledgement that change is desired. The important thing to focus on are quick small wins as well as longer term goals.

  2. Re #8 on knowing the business…this is something we’ve been saying about IT professionals for at least my whole career (since 85). Those who can grok tech stuff and the business end up very successful. Is it any different this time? Perhaps a nuance worth highlighting for data scientist type roles?

    • I would also include change management as an important skill. That way the organization can act on numerical insights, which is in some ways, more important than the analysis.

  1. Re #6 on CDO profiles. This brings to mind the early days of the CIO. The early truism was that CIOs only lasted 18 months because the good ones moved up to another company and the bad ones got tossed out. Of course in many cases they weren’t “bad” they just weren’t what the (still figuring it all out) CEO needed. Over time, that CIO churn has settled down. How do you see CDO churn in 2018 and why?

    • In interviews w/ CDOs, they voice that smart CDOs won’t take a role unless there’s support and acknowledgement that change is desired. The important thing to focus on are quick small wins as well as longer term goals.

  2. Re #8 on knowing the business…this is something we’ve been saying about IT professionals for at least my whole career (since 85). Those who can grok tech stuff and the business end up very successful. Is it any different this time? Perhaps a nuance worth highlighting for data scientist type roles?

    • I would also include change management as an important skill. That way the organization can act on numerical insights, which is in some ways, more important than the analysis.