What you may have missed

What You May Have Missed

1. When a cable operator retransmits local TV signals, it pay licensing fees to broadcasters. Aereo is a startup that streams local TV signals over the Internet by keeping individual antennas in the cloud for each of its users. This week the Supreme Court said Aereo is really a cable company and must therefore pay copyright…

what you may have missed

What You May Have Missed

1. Social networking companies have been rolling out new search capabilities that exploit all the metadata they collect.  First it was Facebook with its Graph Search. Now Linkedin has introduced its own social graph search software called Galene–the Greek goddess of calm seas. Users will be able to query Linkedin’s database of 300 million subscribers…

digital universe

The Expanding Data Universe

It’s June and half of the year is almost over. So it’s a good time for a data growth reality check.  Nearly every week, we continue to see validation in our news feed about how data is on an  exponential growth curve. Here’s more evidence: while “only” 4.4 Zettabytes of data was generated in 2013,…

What you may have missed

What You May Have Missed

1. If you liked our piece on the national health database, here’s an excellent NPR audio recording of the Diane Rehm Show, The Promise And Perils Of A New Project To Share Individual Patient Records. More than just a report about the health database, Joe Selby, Executive Director of PCORI addresses privacy rights as well…

what you may have missed

What You May Have Missed

1. According to the FTC, there are 33 states that sell de-identified patient health information that is possible to re-identify and I was sad to learn our health data is worth a measly 50 bucks. 2. At a recent FTC workshop about Consumer Generated and Controlled Health Data, they covered a range of topics, from…

Heidelberg, Hörsaal in der Universität

The Lowdown on PCI DSS and Two-Factor Authentication

With the big security breaches from last year on our minds and with little new information available, there’s still plenty to puzzle over. One aspect of the Target breach that left security observers scratching their heads was the ease with which the hackers were able to gain access to the internal network by just swiping…

Peace is our profession

The NSA’s Other Security Factor: Two-Factor Authorization

We’ve already written about how Snowden took advantage of holes in the NSA’s porous security controls.  Sure, he gamed the system by either faking someone else’s credentials or by using his admin account to adjust existing user profiles. This allowed him access to documents requiring a higher security-level clearance than he’d been given. But one…

What You May Have Missed

What You May Have Missed

1. Can a CEO lose his job over a data breach?  Earlier this month, the board of directors at Target replaced its chief executive after a massive data breach that ultimately hurt the company’s bottom line. For a legal analysis of why the board had no choice, read this piece on the importance of having…

Digital StillCamera

Ultimate Security Wisdom From Verizon’s DBIR: Limit, Control, and Monitor

For those in IT too busy to read the 60-page Data Breach Investigations Report, Verizon provides the shorter executive summary. And to summarize the summary, they’ve come up with seven tips based on their analysis of over 60,000 security incidents. If I had to condense this list into a simple one sentence security mantra it…

What You May Have Missed

What You May Have Missed

1. In the unregulated world of social media, the FTC has become the de facto enforcer of privacy. Snapchat is the photo sharing service that promised customers their photos and videos would automatically self-destruct. On Thursday, they admitted to the FTC that photos don’t actually disappear forever. As part of the FTC settlement, Snapchat agreed to be monitored by an independent auditor for the next 20 years.